About your Search

20121001
20121031
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
a stark picture of what 24 hours is like in an inner-city pr -- e.r. we are glad you have joined us. a conversation with peter nicks coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: the issue of health care has been a constant conversation in this country over the past few years, amplified during this campaign season. behind the politics of health care is the reality of what many americans face, especially in inner cities. peter nicks decided to chronicle a day in a life of an open emergency room. the film is called "the waiting room" and is being called one of the best documentary projects of the year. it is playing in select cities across the country. here are s
had to interact before because they had this city's separating them and they had to interact with the local law enforcement and local government. the local government is going, what is going on here? vegas was part of nevada and utah were mormon. the center of power used to be in salt lake city. it is still, to a degree. it was frowned upon. there was gambling and prostitution down there. with all this money, i think the folks up there when, hey, we should get our hands around this and get control of the situation. it made for strange bedfellows. really odd marriages of really different cultures in a way that we had not seen before. tavis: what are you learning so far about walking in the shoes of a wise guy, trying to go good? >> is really an interesting perspective. let's -- try to divorce yourself from me for a moment. this is part of my process. reading, talking to individuals, taking in information from whatever quarter i can find it. the attitude is, not speaking for myself, what separates me from law enforcement? nothing. they are just the people with the badges. they
of nowhere." it opens this weekend in new york, l.a., and other select cities. we're glad you joined us. a conversation with filmmaker ava duvernay coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ava duvernay became the first african-american woman to win best director at this year's sundance film festival. the movie is set in south l.a. and looks at the life of a woman whose husband is sentenced to eight years in prison. here are some scenes from "middle of nowhere." >> do not be marder. >> i am a wife. >> we will see each other every weekend. >> i do not want you to stop for me, baby. >> we're somewhere in between, in the middle place. >> he is a convicted felon. >> i am trying
veteran, a woman who was also 38, a librarian from new york city. he brought her out there and things went pretty well for them until world war two came along. of course, there is a lot of misery involved. why would i write a book without misery in it? people do not really want to be miserable -- tavis: speaking of world war two and misery, you wrote this book during our break recession. -- our great recession. how does the timing of writing a book impact the riding of the book? >> great observation. the second story takes place during the depression. the lester family became quite well known as a result. they were featured on night magazine with photos, swiss family lester. the whole country was in a depression and they fixated on this family as living apart of their own country and being self-sustaining. they had two young daughters while they were there. the daughters had never been a short period when they first came ashore to santa barbara, they were 4 and 7 years old. the press followed them around. the girls had never seen a tree, a house, a car. their first ice cream cone was repor
are in los angeles. they are lined up all over the city. if you have just now come to know this brilliant artist, you now know the name, and you should add it to his collection. if you already know him, you are already in love with him. this project is called black radio. there you have it, and the new project is out, and it is called black radio. your first time on the show, i pray not your last. that is our show tonight. until next time, thanks for watching. keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with a harvard professor of sarah lawrence-lightfoot. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do thei try to live my life every daywe know that we are only halfway and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more.
are like, what is broken, let's change that. if you go to an inner-city neighborhood and someone wants to do something innovative, they will say, you are experimenting with my kid, how come they are not doing this in the rich neighborhoods? it is not just for the rich kids or the underserved kids. it is not some type of weird, only for you or only for them. tavis: i asked earlier what stands in the way of implementing these kind of ideas to a greater degree. let me ask another question. what are your internal challenges to scaling up what you want to do, to being where you want to be in five or 10 years? >> to be somewhat shameless, we are not for profit. we look like a tech company, but we are not. to scale a and b this kind of institution for the world, we need support of people. that is something i worry about every day. on top of that, it is really up to us to make sure we are using the right tools, working with educators and researchers, to make sure we are listening to what is needed and make sure -- all of the evidence, we are seeing it move the dial in a lot of schools. tavis:
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)